Draft of BS 8300 -2 available for comment

Standard

British standards are helping businesses thrive. Some of them define access for disabled people outside and inside public buildings.

What is a British Standard?

Standards define best practice in many different areas. They’re put together by groups of experts and come in a number of different kinds, from a set of definitions to a series of strict rules. 

… Standards are not the same thing as government regulations, but they’re often used in legislation to provide the technical detail.

(BSI, 2017)

Standard BS 8300 defines access requirements from ‘set down points’ in car parks to the distance to the toilet or width of lifts. There is a section about toilet access, dimensions, fixtures, fittings etc which is best practice. 
A new draft for BS 8300 is available to read and comment on. There are two parts – the toilet section is on 8300-2.

Link to draft BS 8300-1 and BS 8300-2 (enter 8300 in the search). 

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When is a Changing Place not a Changing Place?

Standard

A somewhat heated debate has begun regarding Changing Places – toilet spaces which include a hoist and a bench for disabled people.

Partly this is due to two things:

  1. A new type of toilet called Space to Change
  2. Changing Places being built which do not meet the British Standard for space requirements.

Toilet_scale.jpg

Space to Change

Space-to-Change-Closomat_360_360_int.png A campaign from Firefly, and supported by Clos-o-Mat, is promoting a toilet with a 7m square Space to Change (3m x 2.5m min). This space has a hoist, changing bench and many of the facilities you would find in a regular wheelchair accessible toilet.

The campaign has been going since 2014 and this minimum size and fixtures/equipment is a useful alternative for businesses who just don’t have the space for a Changing Place.

Clos-o-Mat provide more information on this section of their web-site.

They are to “bridge the gap between typical ‘Document M’ accessible toilets and the ultimate, a Changing Places facility”.

It is marketed as a ‘if you have to provide a wheelchair accessible toilet then you might as well add a bit of extra space for a bench and a hoist’.

Advantages

  • This seems very sensible as the reality is that small venues may simply not have space for a large CP toilet layout which has a minimum of 12 m square.
  • Might encourage more toilets to move from Doc M basics to Space to Change.
  • Costs may be less

Disadvantages

  • Not currently referenced in Doc M (will it be included in the future?) unlike CP toilets. CP toilets are mentioned as desirable.
  • Not included in the current British Standard like CP toilets are.
  • Hoist may be a portable hoist – which in this small space, might make it unusable for people with extra large powered wheelchairs and two carers, or moving between toilet and bench via hoist.
  • Large venues like stadiums and shopping centres/leisure complexes might drop down to this small format when they could easily accommodate a full CP toilet.
  • Should not be listed on the CP toilet map – but maybe the map should include CP and STC toilets? I personally don’t want to trawl through two separate toilet maps or lists of different ones held by two organisations to find a toilet.
  • Changing benches do not have to be height adjustable.
  • A large waste bin for pads is not specified aside the regular bin inclusion for sanitary waste and a ‘waste bin’ found in regular toilets.

It is important to note that neither a CP or STC toilet are required within the law for building regulations.

Further debate on the size of installation…

People are spotting toilets included on the CP toilet map which are smaller than the British Standard. It is worth noting that in the early days (prior to June 2013) of CP toilets, the standard was 7 m square – and are included on the map. Many people are getting these confused with ‘Space to Change’ toilets going on the map.

A more recent (2014) installation at Emirates Stadium is said to be smaller than the CP standard yet heavily promoted as a full CP toilet.  From the photos it does look a lot smaller than standard.

For other people, branding is a big issue – some toilets using the CP symbol where no hoist exists and other CP toilets calling them other things like ‘Adult Changing Room’ and ‘High Dependency Unit’.

I have been in small changing places fitted before 2013 – and space was an issue. However, often the layout is poor – space is more about location of equipment not just physical room size. My bathroom at home is fairly small yet I still have room to hoist with carers.

What we found out

So, the debate continues, meanwhile the new British Standards are being looked at and we had the opportunity to submit thoughts and recommendations from our readers and project contributors.

There was a clear need for a range of toilet spaces in size and equipment for small buildings. Also that in larger buildings such as cinemas, stadiums, shopping areas, hospitals, parks/tourist venues and large work places – then even a full CP toilet isn’t meeting people’s needs and that the Standard needs to be raised to support the large number of people who need adjustable toilet risers and washing/drying bidets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Launching 3 exciting publications

Standard

Today we launch the first of 3 new publications that you can download from our links/resources page

Legal_requirements

Guide to Accessible Toilet Standards and Equality Act Requirements.

This 17 page guide is to help raise awareness about the standards, guidelines and equality laws surrounding the provision of toilets for use by disabled people and their carers/assistants.

We hope you will find the information useful if you:

  • Are passionate about improving the accessibility and usefulness of toilets for disabled people through campaigns and personal discussions.
  • Wish to raise discussions with a business concerning a difficulty you have had accessing or using provided toilets.
  • Provide toilets for disabled staff, visitors, customers and volunteers – and wish to provide the highest possible standard of ‘away from home’ toilets.
  • Are committed to the welcoming provision of a truly accessible toilet to demonstrate your commitment to social inclusion and equality.

 

Content

British Standards and AD M 
When do AD M requirements apply?
What if a new toilet does not follow these standards?
Types of accessible toilets 
Equality of toilet provision – what the law says. 
Be aware of ‘compliant’ suppliers
The duty to make reasonable adjustment and AD M
Do I have to follow the solutions in AD M?
Employment law
Human rights
UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
Making adjustments 
What reasonable adjustments might include.
Auxiliary aids or services
Attracting customers and improving community inclusion
Facilities on request.
Thank you to:

*AD M = Approved Document M.  This is available from the official planning portal web-site [http://www.planningportal.gov.uk] for the most up to date information and documents.